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Projects --> Surgical Webcasts

Surgical Webcasts

OR-LiveThe Global Neuroscience Initiative Foundation has teamed with OR-Live by slp3D, a major Internet Broadcasting company, to distribute neurosurgical and neurological archived Surgical Webcasts for afflicted individuals, medical professionals, and the general public.

The following webcasts are available to freely view and many have associated free Continuing Medical Education (CME) and/or Continuing Education Units (CEU) options:

For Other Specialties:

Cardiovascular/Cardiothoracic | Careers | Gastroenterology | General Thoracic Surgery | OBGYN | Oncology | Ophthalmology | Orthopaedics | Otolaryngology | Pediatrics | Pulmonology | Radiology | Urology | Vascular Surgery


Herniated Disc Repair with METRx (Neurosurgery)

 

June 16, 2004

Methodist University Hospital presents herniated disc repair using MicroDiscectomy technique known as the METRx system, a minimal access process with incisions smaller than a dime.  Annually, more than 250,000 Americans undergo surgery to remove or repair herniated discs, a leading cause of back pain. While this type of operation eventually can improve function, recovery time has traditionally proven to be painful and last several weeks. However, a new MicroDiscectomy technique known as the METRx system allows surgeons to repair debilitating herniated discs using a minimal access process, with incisions smaller than a dime. Read more...

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Cervical Discectomy with Fusion Anterior Approach (Spine Surgery)

 

February 10, 2004

Millions of people suffer from pain in their necks or arms. A common cause of cervical pain is a rupture or herniation of one or more of the cervical discs. This happens when the annulus of the disc tears and the soft nucleus squeezes out. As a result, pressure is placed on the nerve root or the spinal cord and causes pain in the neck, shoulders, arms and sometimes the hands. Cervical disc herniations can occur as a result of aging, wear and tear, or sudden stress like from an accident. An anterior cervical discectomy is the most common surgical procedure to treat damaged cervical discs. Its goal is to relieve pressure on the nerve roots or on the spinal cord by removing the ruptured disc. Watch neurosurgeons at St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee perform this surgery.  Read more...

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Facial Nerve Neuroma with Gamma Knife™ Surgery (Neurosurgery)

 

December 3, 2003

Gamma Knife is a non-invasive treatment using 201 precisely focused beams of cobalt-60 radiation to destroy lesions without harming surrounding health tissue. The landmark technology benefits patients with brain tumors, vascular malformations and other brain disorders, which are often considered inoperable or present unacceptable risks. Watch as neurosurgeons from Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta treat a patient with facial nerve neuroma live with Gamma Knife surgery.  Read more...

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Mini-Open Antero-Lumbar Interbody Fusion  (Spine Surgery)

 

October 30, 2004

Degenerative disc disease usually occurs when a disc becomes dehydrated and loses height. When this happens, the disc becomes arthritic and inflamed, which can result in extreme, and often chronic, pain for the patient. Surgeons at Brigham and Women's Hospital will be performing in a live broadcast a Mini-Open Antero-Lumbar Interbody Fusion procedure, using bone graft to replace the damaged disc, which will stabilize the affected area.  Read more...

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Minimally Invasive Treatment for Brain Aneurysms (Neurosurgery)

 

October 21, 2003

Approximately 2 million Americans have brain aneurysms, and about 1 out of 6 have more than one. Hartford Hospital is introducing a revolutionary angiographic biplane lab enhancing the performance of minimally invasive treatments for those suffering from brain aneurysms. Connecticut’s first Fully-Integrated 3D Biplane Angiographic Lab, will be the site of an Internet webcast from Hartford Hospital.  Read more...

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Minimally Invasive Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) (Spine Surgery)

 

October 7, 2003

A new surgical approach is helping patients with ruptured discs to get back in action with less discomfort along the way. The innovative technique, Minimally Invasive Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF), relieves pressure on the nerve and resulting pain associated with a ruptured disc. Charles L. Branch Jr., M.D., Professor and Chair of Neurosurgery, at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, who helped adapt the minimally invasive technique which allows surgeons to operate through a one inch incision, will perform the procedure. During the webcast, he will prop open a normal width space between the vertebrae, remove extraneous bone adjacent to the disc, remove the ruptured disc material, and pack the space with the patient's own morselized bone, which will solidify and fuse the vertebrae overtime.  Read more...

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Endovascular Coil Embolization (Neurosurgery)

 

September 16, 2003

Neurointerventional doctors from Borgess Medical Center will demonstrate Endovascular Coil Embolization, a medically revolutionizing surgical treatment for brain aneurysms. Coil Embolization offers another option for treatment of brain aneurysms which is less invasive and requires less recovery time.  This will be the first coil embolization procedure broadcast anywhere in the United States.  Read more...

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Spinal Repair: Vertebroplasty (Spine Surgery)

 

January 28, 2003

Philips Medical Systems presents a live internet seminar featuring “Spinal Repair: Vertebroplasty”. Vertebroplasty is a safe, minimally invasive procedure that reduces or eliminates pain caused by spinal compression fractures, which largely afflict patients with osteoporosis. Nearly 10 million Americans, 80% of them women, suffer from osteoporosis, a progressive weakening of the bones, which often leads to vertebral compression fractures. Nearly 1.2 million painful vertebral compression fractures occur each year in the U.S. As the population ages, the incidence of osteoporotic fractures is expected to double. In the past, people suffering from this form of spinal fracture were treated with painkillers, surgery and/or restricted activity. Patients now have access to vertebroplasty treatment, stabilizing the spine in less than 24 hours.  Read more...

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Brain Tumor Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (Neurosurgery)

 

January 21, 2003

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center presents an internet broadcast of the treatment of a patient with a malignant brain tumor using Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS).  Gamma Knife SRS is a method of delivering an ultra-precise, highly focused dose of radiation to an intracranial target. Based on nearly 40 years of clinical experience, Gamma Knife SRS has become the treatment of choice for selected benign and malignant brain tumors and vascular malformations involving the brain, as an alternative to conventional open surgery. Read more...

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Deep Brain Stimulation Procedure for Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

 

April 24, 2002

Deep brain stimulation is a highly effective treatment for Parkinson's disease recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for all of the disease's movement symptoms. The treatment can relieve tremor, slowness of movement, and rigidity. Neurosurgeons implant a "pacemaker" that provides mild electrical stimulation to the brain. The electrical stimulation blocks signals that cause the movement symptoms. Dr. Stephen Tatter, M.D., a neurosurgeon at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, performed the innovative procedure.  Read more...

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